Research & Education

CAP/IASLC/AMP Molecular Testing Guideline: Open Comment Period

Public Open Comment Period from June 28 to Aug. 2, 2016

Thank you for your interest in the public open comment period. The current draft recommendations are the product of an Expert Panel charged with reaffirming, updating, and revising the Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Guideline from the College of American Pathologists (CAP), International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), and Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) published in 2013.

Adjuvant Chemotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Patients with Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

DENVER – The use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients improves overall survival (OS) and 5-year OS in patients with tumor sizes ranging from 3.1 – 7 cm.

APLCC 2016 Calls on Asian-Pacific Governments to Help Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths by 1/3rd by 2030

APLCC 2016
 

IASLC Consensus Statement on Optimizing Management of EGFR Mutation Positive NSCLC Patients

DENVER – The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) created the 2016 consensus statement on optimizing management of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation positive (M+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO), to discuss key pathologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations. The statement also makes recommendations for clinical guidance and research priorities, such as optimal choice of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), management of brain metastasis, role of re-biopsies, and use of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) for molecular studies.

The Deeming Rule Explained: What the Public Health Community Needs to Know

WEBINAR DATE: May 19, 2016 at 1:00pm CT

The FDA recently took an important step to protect public health by publishing a final rule to begin regulating e-cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products.

Conversation with Dr. Gilberto Lopez in Conjunction with 2016 Asia Pacific Lung Cancer Conference (APLCC)

One of the most pressing problems in oncology today is the rising costs of cancer treatment. Cancer medication costs in the U.S. have doubled during the last decade: from $5,000 a month to about $10,000-$12,000 per month. One of the reasons for this could be the high costs and time period involved in developing new drugs. “It can take more than 15 years and over $2.8 billion to develop a new drug,” said Dr. Gilberto Lopez, a medical oncologist in Brazil and Chief Medical Officer for the Oncoclinicas Group – the largest oncologists’ group in Latin America with more than 300 physician members. Dr. Lopez is also the Associate Editor of the Journal of Global Oncology.

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