Research & Education

Metabolic Phenotyping of Blood Plasma Allows for the Detection of Lung Cancer

DENVER – Metabolic phenotyping of blood plasma by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) identified unique metabolic biomarkers specific to lung cancer patients and allowed for the accurate identification of a cohort of patients with early and late-stage lung cancer.

FDA-Approved ALK IHC CDx is Superior to Another IHC Assay for Patient Selection of ALK Inhibitor Treatment

DENVER – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved VENTANA anti-ALK(D5F3)CDx performed more accurately than another commonly used immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay, based on the use of the 5A4 clone, for the selection of patients eligible to receive ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment.

Autoantibodies May Help Detect Lung Cancer Earlier

DENVER – Preliminary research has identified autoantibodies, immune proteins found in the blood specific for one’s own proteins, that can potentially detect lung cancer early by distinguishing between smokers with or without lung cancer and also discriminate between lung cancer and low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) detected non-cancerous lung lesions.

Afatinib Shows Clinical Benefit for Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases

DENVER – Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with common epidermal growth factor (EGFR) mutations and brain metastases showed improved progression-free survival (PFS) and response from the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) afatinib compared to standard platinum doublet chemotherapy.

Stage Increase in Lung Cancer More Frequent After Open vs. Closed Thoracic Surgery

DENVER – An increase in the stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) due to cancer positive lymph node (LN) discovery was more common following open chest surgery for lung lobe removal of early stage lung cancer compared to the closed chest procedure known as video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS).

Improving Access to Clinical Trials When Biopsies Are Required

DENVER – The requirement for tumor tissue specimens and associated analyses in order to participate in clinical trials appears to be a significant barrier to clinical trial enrollment and may delay treatment. Potential solutions to reducing or eliminating these barriers include routine tissue banking at diagnosis, easing use of available diagnostic samples, development of less invasive tests, faster turnaround time at central laboratories or allowing for local testing and more resources for timely tissue collection.

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