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DENVER, Colo. – EGFR mutant (M+) is one of the most common driver oncogenes in lung cancer, typified by high response rates when treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), and median progression free survival of 10 months, commonly due to emergence of T790M. The genomic architecture and spectra of EGFR M+ tumors may provide insights to mechanisms of treatment failure and no previous study describes this well.

DENVER, Colo. — Smoking cessation among patients enrolled in a low-dose computed tomography screening program is associated with a three-to-five times reduction in mortality, according to research presented today at 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver.

DENVER, Colo. – Adding the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab to chemotherapy treatment for patients with surgically removed non-small cell lung cancer did not improve overall survival, according to research presented today at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver.

DENVER, Colo. — Oncology researchers must “lace up our running shoes,” to keep up with the fast pace of lung cancer research, said Dr. David R. Gandara, Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, director, Thoracic Oncology Program, Senior Advisor to the Director, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, Calif.

DENVER, Colo. — Previously, researchers reporting on SQUIRE study results demonstrated that the addition of necitumamub to gemcitabine-cisplatin improved overall survival in patients with stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Following up on these findings, Dr. Fred R. Hirsch, Professor of Medicine and Pathology at the University of Colorado, today presented additional analysis of the relationship with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein and EGFR gene copy number at 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver, Colo.

DENVER, Colo. — Researchers expect that the administration of molecular-targeted therapies will be considered for the advanced-stage of adenocarcinoma in young lung cancer patients, according to a presentation by Dr. Kosuke Tanaka, department of Cancer Genetics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine; Division of Molecular Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Japan. Dr. Tanaka presented his data at 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver.

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