Research & Education

IASLC European Webinar Series - 2015/2016 - Treatment of ALK-Positive NSCLC

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 7 p.m. Central European Standard Time - Recording Available

EML4 ALK inversion produces a new fusion protein kinase receptor active in 5-7% of lung adenocarcinomas. A number of small, oral molecules ALK TKI inhibitors have been developed recently. These agents have been shown to highly active and capable of substantial control of ALK driven disease. In this online educational presentation, we examine these data from recent clinical trials and address the role of ALK TKI inhibitors in current treatment paradigms.

New Frontiers in the Management of Lung Cancer

Launch: April 18, 2016; Termination: April 17, 2019

 INTERNET ENDURING MATERIAL

Cell Free DNA Diagnostics in Lung Cancer Management

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 at 9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time - Recording Available

This lecture will focus on cell free DNA in lung cancer. Topics covered will include the origin and biology of cell free DNA in this disease. Analytic and clinical validity studies, as well as evidence of clinical utility in medical decision making, will also be discussed.

Centrally Located Early-Stage Lung Cancer: When and How to Perform Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR)

Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4 p.m. Central European Time - Recording Available

The IASLC Education Committee is pleased to announce the first program in the 2016 series of Live Webinars presented by the Advanced Radiation Therapy (ART) Committee. This subcommittee is focused on the development and execution of educational and informational programs addressing state of the art radiation therapy for lung cancer. This live program will be moderated by Francoise Mornex, MD, PhD and feature presentations by Suresh Senan, MD, PhD, FRCR, and Wilko Verbakel, PhD, Ir, PEDng.

IASLC European Webinar Series - 2015/2016 - Treatment of Squamous Cell NSCLC: What's New?

Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 7 p.m. Central European Time - Recording Available

Currently, the standard first-line treatment option for squamous cell NSCLC is cytotoxic chemotherapy (including cisplatin or carboplatin and a third-generation agent such as gemcitabine, taxanes, or vinorelbine.Targeted therapies have been tested in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy but outcomes have been disappointing because of increased toxicity or lack of efficacy. Bevacizumab is contraindicated in patients with squamous histology tumours owing to a prohibitively high rate of severe pulmonary haemorrhage associated with bevacizumab treatment.

The Evolving Landscape of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Therapy

Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at 9 p.m. Eastern Standard Time - Recording Available

In this program, Dr. Lauren Averett Byers will discuss the current treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and review emerging therapies -- including novel targeted drugs and immunotherapies that are being investigated in clinical trials and in the lab. Recent results from clinical trials and translational studies in SCLC will be discussed, as well as representative case studies.

Proton Beam Therapy for Lung Cancer

Friday, February 12, 2016 - 6 p.m. CET - Recording Available

The IASLC Education Committee is pleased to announce the first program in the 2016 series of Live Webinars presented by the Advanced Radiation Therapy (ART) Committee. This subcommittee is focused on the development and execution of educational and informational programs addressing state of the art radiation therapy for lung cancer. This live program will be moderated by Francoise Mornex, MD, PhD and feature presentations by Ramesh Rengan, MD, PhD and Tony Wong, PhD, DABR.

IASLC European Webinar Series - 2015/2016 - Maintenance Therapy in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 7 p.m. CET - Recording Available

In patients with metastasized non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the current typical first-line treatment approaches are four cycles cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma. As an alternative, centers still administer carboplatin, paclitaxel and bevacizumab and these are given for four to six cycles. Strategies of maintenance chemotherapy include "switch maintenance" with changing from four cycles carbo/pacli/bev or other non-pemetrexed combinations to maintenance pemetrexed until the time of progression and "continuation maintenance" with keeping single agent pemetrexed as ongoing treatment following four cycles of cisplatin and pemetrexed. Both strategies have been shown in large prospectively randomized phase-III trials (JMEN, PARAMOUNT) to significantly improve median overall survival at about three months as well as double the median PFS at very little costs of toxicity. This strategy has since become an important option to patients for the management armamentatium of metastasized non-small-cell lung cancer without any druggable driver mutation.

Taking Bites of the KRAS Pie: Co-occurring mutations define KRAS subsets with distinct biology, immune profiles, and drug vulnerabilities

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 9 p.m. EST - Recording Available

IASLC continues the Lung Cancer Series in 2016 with this LIVE WEBINAR featuring Dr. John Heymach.

KRAS is the most common oncogenic driver in non-small cell lung cancer and other solid tumors. Despite great rapid recent progress in the treatment other oncogene-driven malignancies, to date there are still no targeted therapies for KRAS mutant lung cancers. A major obstacle to progress in this area is the heterogeneity among different KRAS tumors. Here, we discuss how co-occurring genomic alterations impact KRAS signaling and define distinct KRAS subgroups with different drug response patterns and immune profiles, and how such an understanding of Kras subsets can lead to development of more refined therapeutic approaches.

IASLC European Webinar Series - 2015/2016 - Advances in Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 - 6:30 p.m. CET - Recording Available

Radiotherapy for lung cancer is rapidly changing. Today, stereotactic irradiation (SBRT) is recognized as a safe and efficient treatment technique for smaller lung tumors (NSCLC). The approach to centrally located tumors is more controversial. In advanced-stage III disease, several large clinical trials have attempted to address the optimal incorporation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for stage III disease.

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