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DENVER, Colo. – EGFR mutant (M+) is one of the most common driver oncogenes in lung cancer, typified by high response rates when treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), and median progression free survival of 10 months, commonly due to emergence of T790M. The genomic architecture and spectra of EGFR M+ tumors may provide insights to mechanisms of treatment failure and no previous study describes this well.

DENVER, Colo. — Smoking cessation among patients enrolled in a low-dose computed tomography screening program is associated with a three-to-five times reduction in mortality, according to research presented today at 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver.

DENVER, Colo. – Adding the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab to chemotherapy treatment for patients with surgically removed non-small cell lung cancer did not improve overall survival, according to research presented today at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in Denver.

DENVER, Colo. — Oncology researchers must “lace up our running shoes,” to keep up with the fast pace of lung cancer research, said Dr. David R. Gandara, Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, director, Thoracic Oncology Program, Senior Advisor to the Director, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, Calif.

DENVER, Colo. — The percentage of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who never smoked is on the rise, according to a report conducted of lung cancer patients in three hospitals in Texas and Tennessee. Dr. Lorraine Pelosof, Assistant Professor, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas presented the research at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

DENVER, Colo. – Lung cancer researchers in Great Britain discovered that the incidence of people who never smoked and were diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increased from 13 percent to 28 percent in a seven-year period. The research was presented today by Dr. Eric Lim, Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) hosted by the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

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